Acting with Inaction: The Sage as Water

How does a sage navigate through society without losing the Tao?
How does a sage navigate through society without losing the Tao?

Acting with Inaction can be a difficult concept to grasp if taken literally. That’s why the context in which it is meant is very important; for understanding Acting with Inaction, the context is as important as the concept itself.

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Multiple Interpretations of the Zhuangzi

Butcher Ting

Surprisingly, the Zhuangzi has its own article on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but after reading it, Hui and I thought it to be contrived or misinterpreted.

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Lao Tzu’s Trash-Salad

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According to a passage, which I’m going to paint in a more vibrant light while still retaining its pith, a passage in either the Tao Te Ching or the Zhuangzi (I’m not certain which it is), Lao Tzu, being as resourceful as ever, thought it fit to scrounge up a salad for his sister in hopes that her venerable hunger can reach a veritable satiety, at least to the extent which a salad from trash can achieve.

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Taoist Musings: Split Knee

Disclaimer: You are not ready for such wisdom.
Disclaimer: You are not ready for such wisdom and insight, grand as it is.

God Tao, please inspire these prickly fingers of mine so that I may write so fine a piece such that all would want to sit and read with blanket fleece. Or prostrate to this the True Taoist’s post (I’m referring to me and not Tao if non-evident be my boast), which provides a mere glance into True Taoist ways, for all is taken to be as it may.

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My Boss’ Annoyance with Me

 

The Sage, more commonly known as a plant, is the perfect man who moves when moved, who acts with inaction, according to the Zhuangzi.
The Sage, more commonly known as a plant, is the perfect man who moves when moved, who acts with inaction, according to the Zhuangzi.

In the Fall of last year, I started my office job, the position farcically titled “Executive Assistant to the Assistant Dean.” I was wondering what would comprise my duties; I was told that I’d be transcribing notes from meetings, helping others around the office, and proofreading emails for the assistant dean: doing really important stuff. Continue reading My Boss’ Annoyance with Me