Can 1 come from 0?

Nothing
Nothing

There seems to be an assumption in, let’s say, metaphysics, that everything must have came from something, which makes sense for apparent reasons. A concept of nothing seems to be just a concept, since nobody has dealt with absolute Nothing. Infinitely regressing to the first “something,” or infinitely progressing to the last something, depending on how you look at it shows the uncertainty in if there is a first (or last), if it is indeed finite, infinite, or circular, according to conventional possibilities.

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Multiple Interpretations of the Zhuangzi

Butcher Ting

Surprisingly, the Zhuangzi has its own article on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but after reading it, Hui and I thought it to be contrived or misinterpreted.

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Eastern Philosophy: Not Mystical But Metaphorical

Mount Sanqing, an important Taoist Mountain, can create a sense of magic with its greatness.
Mount Sanqing, an important Taoist Mountain, can create a sense of magic with its greatness.

To many people, Philosophical Taoism and Buddhism are full of strange and fanciful ideas; it may seem absurd that a bird or a mouse could be the reincarnation of a relative or that people can achieve immorality by living stress-free, but these ideas and many others are taken out of context, only allowing potential seekers of “spirituality” and onlookers to engage with the concepts in a straightforward manner. This leads people to think that these philosophies have some sort of “magic” in them.

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The Double-Edged Sword of Eastern Philosophy

 

Words are very inconsistent in what they mean and try to bound the boundless.
Words are very inconsistent in what they mean and try to bound the boundless.

I was trying to pick arguments to analyze for an assignment in my philosophy class. I came up with four or five candidates, three of which were from Zhuangzi and one of which was from the Spring and Autumn Annals. In picking the arguments, I noticed that most of the eastern ones were arguments by analogy and that they employed figurative language. So, when I’m trying to analyze eastern philosophy, those traits often present some problems.

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“The Man of the World” vs “The Worldly Man”

Witty, intellegent, lighthearted, and espescially emotional, Voltaire is a man of the world, a man whom others of the 18th century modeled. Yet on the basis that it's cruel or delusional, he ridiculed the philosophy of Leibniz, which argued that unfortunate things balance and create the best world.
Witty, intelligent, lighthearted, and especially emotional, Voltaire is a man of the world, a man whom others of the 18th century modeled. Yet on the basis that it’s cruel or delusional, he ridiculed the philosophy of Leibniz, which argued that unfortunate things balance and create the best world.

To describe a man who’s the epitome of men, some people use the phrase: a man’s man. This is a compliment just like the phrase: a man of the world.

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